Proper Names

A list of Classically resonant names of people, places, and things in Trollope’s novels, alphabetized according to the part of the name with the tie to Classics.

 

ADITUS

(in The Fixed Period) This was the name that President Neverbend had proposed for the college, which is finally named “Necropolis” instead.  This Latin noun means “an access” or “entrance.”  It is probable that Neverbend considered the name appropriate on multiple levels:  the college being an entrance for those deposited into a year of peace before a calm departure, and the Fixed Period being the entrance into a new age of rationality and civilization.  The proposal of a Classically inspired name could be considered part of Neverbend’s overall language program that attempts to acclimate Brittanula to the Fixed Period through words of Classical origin.  [CMC 2012]

 

ALEXANDRINA de Courcy (married name, Crosbie)

(in Doctor Thorne and The Small House at Allington; mentioned as deceased in The Last Chronicle of Barset) This name of one of Lady de Courcy’s daughters is a feminized, Anglicized version of the Greek name Alexandros.  This name may contain references to more than one classical figure.  Alexandrina’s ambitious pursuit of Crosbie is reminiscent of the strong-willed Greek leader Alexander the Great.  Alexander is also another name used to refer to Paris, whose adulterous relationship with Helen causes the Trojan War.  Similarly, Alexandrina interferes with Crosbie and Lily’s engagement and causes trouble for them both.  Cassell’s Dictionary of Classical Mythology.  [EB 2006]

 

Pessimist ANTICANT

(in The Warden) “Pessimist” from Latin pessimus “worst;” “Anticant” from Greek anti “against or in opposition,” and Latin cantare “to sing.” “Cant” in English comes to refer to language that is hypocritical, whining, monotonous, or specialized to the point of obscurity.  OED.  [JM & RR 2005]

 

AUGUSTA Gresham

(in Doctor Thorne, Framley Parsonage, and The Small House at Allington) Of Mr. Gresham’s six named daughters, five have names with Classical roots:  Selina, Helena, Sophy, Beatrice, and Augusta.  ”Augusta” is a feminine form of the name held by the first Roman emperor and means “venerable.”  While most of the girls’ names seems to be rather arbitrary, Augusta’s does seem to have been chosen to suit her personality.  She seems to have more of her mother’s De Courcy blood than any of her other siblings, and she certainly has an idea that her blood entitles her to respect.  She also has a very Roman attitude towards her engagement with Mr. Moffat, agreeing to it in order to do her duty to her family although she has no particular fondness for her fiance.  Mike Campbell, Behind the Name.  [JC 2005]

 

AUGUSTA Proudie

(in Barchester Towers) The name of one of Bishop Proudie’s daughters, “Augusta” is the feminine version of the name of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus Caesar.  This classical reference might be poking fun at the authoritative situation in the Proudie household.  Unlike Augustus Caesar, Bishop Proudie is a weak, pathetic ruler; however, his wife, Mrs. Proudie, is a powerful matriarch who makes her husband’s decisions for him.  The fact that one of their children is named “Augusta” instead of “Augustus” shows that the woman ultimately has the power in the family.  [MD 2005]

 

AUGUSTUS Green

(in Barchester Towers) The name “Augustus” recalls the first Roman emperor, Augustus Caesar.  It is no wonder (and perhaps a source of amusement) that Augustus Green, who comes from such a wealthy family that he is able to “devote the whole proceeds of his curacy to violet gloves and unexceptionable neck ties,” would have been named after such high-status classical figure.  [JC & RR 2005]

 

AUGUSTUS Lookaloft

(in Barchester Towers) The Lookalofts are part of the tenantry of Ullathorne who, as their name suggests, think themselves of much higher status than the rest of the tenantry.  It is fitting then, that they would name their eldest son after one of the great Roman emperors.  [JC 2005]

There is humor in the very juxtaposition of the Latin first name and the straightforward English surname–which itself reveals the pretension of the first name.  [RR 2011]

 

AUGUSTUS Musselboro

(in The Last Chronicle of Barset) Augustus was the first of the Roman emperors.  His reign is often characterized as a golden age of peace, prosperity, efficiency, and literary activity.  On the surface, the name of the Augustus in this chapter conveys a sense of strength and ability.  However, perhaps Mr. Musselboro’s name is used ironically, since his business is dependent upon the financial support of Mrs. Van Siever.  Mr. Musselboro does not in fact rule or control anything and is subject to the bidding of Mrs. Van Siever.  OCD.  [AM 2006]

 

Lord and Lady AUGUSTUS Trefoil

(in The American Senator) Lord and Lady Augustus Trefoil are the parents of Arabella Trefoil, the fiancée of John Morton.  Trollope humorously names them, as they are not ”august” in any sense of the word.  This name was borne most famously by the Roman emperor Augustus, who won a civil war for control of the Roman empire and through wealth and political power brought about an era of relative peace and prosperity.  Lord Augustus is not particularly important and has little money, living in the shadow of his brother, a duke.  Lady Augustus has even less money and spends her time traveling from friend to friend with her daughter, who searches for a rich bachelor to marry.  [CD 2012]

 

BEATRICE Gresham

(in Doctor Thorne) Of Mr. Gresham’s six named daughters, five have names with Classical roots:  Selina, Helena, Sophy, Beatrice, and Augusta. “Beatrice” is the Italian form of the Latin name Beatrix which is an altered form of the name Viatrix, meaning “voyager.” Mike Campbell, Behind the Name.  [JC 2005]

 

BRITTANULA

(in The Fixed Period) “Brittan-,” from the country Great Britain, and the Latin diminutive ending -ula.  Brittanula is culturally developed from Great Britain, especially in its language and sports.  Brittanula is the means by Trollope satirically explores British society, especially attitudes on reform.  [CD 2012]

 

Crabtree Parva and Crabtree CANONICORUM

(in The Warden and Barchester TowersParva is a Latin adjective meaning “small.”  It is a play on Crabtree Canonicorum, mentioned in the same paragraph.  ”Canonicorum” is derived from the Latin adjective canonicalis which means “canonical.”  A canonical piece of land is one that belongs to the church.  The name “Crabtree Canonicorum” sounds very prestigious.  Lending it that name makes the reader imagine it to be large, attractive, and in all probability wealthy.  The use of Latin in the case of Crabtree Parva, however, lends it a perhaps jarring sense of classical dignity.  It is a somewhat humorous approach to describing the place.  Leo Stelten, Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin.  Peabody, Massachusetts:  Hendrickson Publishers, 1995.  [TH 2005]

 

Doctor CENTURY

(in Doctor Thorne) Dr. Century is one of the other doctors who work in the same region as Doctor Thorne, but who lives close to the town of Silverbridge.  Dr. Century’s name is probably a reference to his age and antiquated medical knowledge.  The word “century” comes from the Latin word centuria, which referred to 100 soldiers, objects, or a group of voters in ancient Rome.  The word “century” began being used to refer to the years of a person’s life as early as 1626, according to the OED.  [MD 2005]

 

CLARA Van Siever

(in The Last Chronicle of Barset) Clara’s first name is the Latin word meaning “clear” or “bright.”  Clara tends to take a balanced, clear-minded perspective on events, making this a suitable name.  [EB 2006]

 

CONSTANCE Vane

(in The Claverings) We do not meet Constance Vane directly as a character, but Lady Ongar mentions her to Harry Clavering as a type of a fashionable English girl not particular appealing to either of them, though neither says so explicitly.  Though Trollope does not tell us much about Constance, he tells us enough to realize that her name is partly ironic and partly fitting.  Her first name, “Constance,” is related to the Latin participle constans, meaning “standing firm” or even “remaining unchanged.”  But Constance has not been constant in her looks:  she has changed from “a waxen doll of a girl” to a “stout mother of two or three children.”  Her maiden name, “Vane,” recalls the Latin adjective vanus, meaning “empty” and is apt, since Trollope asserts that “she had never had a thought in her head, and hardly ever a word on her lips.”  By giving her this name, Trollope adds linguistic depth to an otherwise insubstantial character.  [RR 2013]

 

Gabriel CRASWELLER

(in The Fixed Period) From the Latin adverb cras, “tomorrow,” and the English adjective “well,” plus the suffix “-er,” which denotes agency.  Crasweller’s name foreshadows his escape from his deposition and eventual euthanasia.  [CD 2012]

 

Lord ECHO

(in The Bertrams) Echo was a mythological figure, a nymph who could talk only by repeating the words of others.  Trollope, in naming a character (mentioned only in passing) “Lord Echo,” focuses on the Lord’s lack of originality, either in thought or word.  Lord Echo probably repeats much of what he hears from others.  [CD 2012]

 

Plumstead EPISCOPI

(in all the Barchester novels) “Episcopi” comes from episcopus, Latin (and earlier, Greek) for “bishop.”  Plumstead Episcopi is the home of archdeacon Grantly, the son of the bishop of Barchester; when the bishop dies in Barchester Towers, archdeacon Grantly is disappointed that he is not appointed as the next bishop.  Greek episcopus also means “overseer,” and episcopi means “of the overseer.”  The archdeacon, who conducts most of the bishop’s business while his father is alive, certainly counts as an overseer of the diocese!  His watchfulness in this regard is marked by Trollope’s comparison of Dr. Grantly to the many-eyed mythological figure of Argus; see commentary for Chapter 2 of The Warden.  [TH & RR 2005; rev. 2011 & 2013]

 

Mr. EXORS

(in The Fixed Period) Mr. Exors is one of the oldest men in Brittanula and is scheduled to be deposited not long after Crasweller.  His name is derived from the Latin exsors, meaning “chosen one.”  He is mentioned in a group of others who are due to be deposited.  All have said in their own way that they will not set foot in the college.  The idea of “chosen one” has an almost sacrificial connotation in The Fixed Period, as though Trollope is signaling that Exors is chosen by Neverbend’s law to be sacrificed and lead Brittanula and the world into a new age of enlightened living (and dying).  [CMC 2012]

 

GATHERUM Castle

In many of Trollope’s novels, “Gatherum” is the name of the Duke of Omnium’s castle.  This is a play on the British phrase “omnium gatherum,” or “gathering of everyone/everything,” used to refer to a gathering of many kinds of people.  ”Gatherum” is actually a faux Latin word, simply comprised of the English “gather” and the Latin ending - um.  OED.  [EB 2006]

 

GLADSTONOPOLIS

(in The Fixed Period) “Gladston-,” which comes from the liberal 19th c. British Prime Minister William Gladstone, and “-opolis,” a combining form derived from the Greek noun polis, “city, city-state.”  Naming the capital of Brittanula “Gladstonopolis” highlights the society’s progressive nature in ratifying the Fixed Period as well as its desire to link itself to Classical forms of expression.  [CD & RR 2012]

 

Captain GLOMAX

(in The American Senator) Captain Glomax is the master of the hunt for the Ufford and Rufford United Hunt Club.  Trollope refers to him in Chapter 8 as a “celebrated sportsman,” perhaps activating an echo of Latin maximus, “greatest,” in the captain’s last name.  [RR 2012]

 

HELENA Gresham

(in Doctor Thorne) Of Mr. Gresham’s six named daughters, five have names with Classical roots:  Selina, Helena, Sophy, Beatrice, and Augusta.  ”Helena” is the Latinate name for Helen, the mythological character whose abduction started the Trojan War. Mike Campbell, Behind the Name. [JC 2005]

 

HERMIONE Clavering

(in The Claverings) In Greek mythology, Hermione is the daughter of Helen and Menelaus.  Trollope’s use of the name in The Claverings probably owes more to Shakespeare than to Classics:  in Shakespeare’s Winter’s Tale, Hermione is a wife treated poorly by her husband, and in The Claverings Hermione is mistreated by her spouse,  Sir Hugh Clavering.  [RR 2012]

 

JULIA Brabazon

(in The Claverings) The gens Julia was a long-standing aristocratic clan in ancient Rome, the most famous member of which was Julius Caesar.  Julia Brabazon’s bearing befits an association of her name with Caesar:  she often tries to take command of situations, she is ambitious for herself, and she is concerned about her status.  [RR 2012]

 

Lady JULIA De Guest

(in The Small House at Allington and The Last Chronicle of Barset) Julia, a feminine form of Julius, was a name for Roman women.  This name is particularly associated with the famous Julio-Claudian dynasty of the Roman Empire, reflecting Lady Julia’s status and pride in her position.  [EB 2006]

 

The JUPITER

(appearing throughout Trollope’s novels; sometimes called the Daily Jupiter) Jupiter was the greatest of the Roman gods, and could hurl lightning bolts at will, hence the usage of “thunderbolt” describing articles appearing in The Jupiter.  In using this name for the newspaper, Trollope playfully presents the paper as omnipotent and authoritative, like the king of the gods himself.  Trollope sometimes includes “The” as part of the newspaper’s title (The Jupiter) and sometimes doesn’t (the Jupiter)–we will try to use The Jupiter consistently, but it’s worth noting that not including “The” in the paper’s name may serve to personify it even more and thereby increase the identification with the king of the gods.  [JM & RR 2005; rev. 2011]

 

Mr. MASTERS

(in The American Senator) From Latin magister, “leader, master.”  By the end of The American Senator Mr. Masters becomes a strong head of the family and lives up to his name’s etymology.  This happens through the marriage of his daughter, Mary, to Reginald Morton, the new squire.  This marriage re-installs Mr. Masters as attorney to the Morton family and ends his struggle with his wife over Mary’s refusal to marry Larry Twentyman.  [CD 2012]

 

Sir LAMDA MEWNEW

(in Barchester Towers) Both first and last names are Greek letters, spelled out.  [JM 2005]

 

Mr. MORTMAIN

(in The Bertrams) The undertaker who prepares the body of the elder Mr. Bertram for burial has a fitting surname.  “Mortmain” means “dead hand.”  The name is composed of Latin elements filtered through French:  mort- (death, dead) and man- (hand).   Not only does Mr. Mortmain handle the dead, but he also provides George Bertram with black gloves for the funeral.  [RR 2012]

 

NECROPOLIS

(in The Fixed Period) The name that was decided upon for the college is “Necropolis,” a Greek term that literally means “city of the dead.”  Here, the Greek word is being used as a euphemism to obfuscate the nature of the college and lessen the anxiety of the citizenry of Brittanula surrounding the Fixed Period.  Further, the London Necropolis Company was controversial in Trollope’s time for constructing a massive cemetery complex, complete with multiple railway stations, a telegraph station, and different areas for different religions.  This caused debate in London, as many were reluctant to move away from the traditional churchyards within their respective cities and towns. Encyclopedia Britannica (electronic version).  [CMC 2012]

 

President NEVERBEND

(in The Fixed Period)  The elected ruler of Britannula is aptly named, since he resolutely promotes adherence to the Fixed Period.  Although “Neverbend” is composed of Old English components, we can find in Sophocles’ Antigone the idea of a ruler not bending to popular feeling.  Creon, the ruler of Thebes, sentences his niece Antigone because she performed burial rights for her brother, an enemy of the city.  Creon’s son Haemon urges him to moderate his views by reminding him that unbending trees can be destroyed. In The Fixed Period, President Neverbend’s son Jack will also oppose his father.  [RR 2012]

Source:  Sophocles, Antigone 712-714.

 

Sir OMICRON PIE

(in Barchester Towers, Doctor Thorne, and The Small House at Allington) Both first and last names are Greek letters, spelled out.  [JM 2005]

 

Duke of OMNIUM

(in Doctor Thorne, Framley Parsonage, The Small House at Allington, and The Last Chronicle of Barset) Translated from the Latin, “the Duke of All.”  Since the Duke is first introduced as sort of a stock character rather than a developed one, it is fitting that his name reflects his status and power.  [JC 2005]

 

Duke and Duchess of OMNIUM

(primarily in the Palliser series, but mentioned in The American Senator and other novels in passing) Glencora MacCluskie marries Plantagenet Palliser, and they become the Duke and Duchess of Omnium when Plantagenet inherits the title and wealth of his uncle, a character first appearing in the Barsetshire series.  Omnium is a Latin word meaning “of all things,” so the very name intimates the riches accompanying the title.  [RR 2012]

 

ONESIPHORUS Dunn

(in The Last Chronicle of Barset) Onesiphorus in Greek literally means “benefit bearer.”  This use of Greek is apt because Onesiphorus in the novel is a help to Lily Dale when she sees Crosbie for the first time after he slighted her in The Small House at Allington.  Onesiphorus also does many favors for Mrs. Thorne.  [KD 2006]

 

OPTIMUS Grey

(in Framley Parsonage) Latin, “very good, best.”  A fitting first name for the Reverend Grey, given how highly Mrs. Proudie thinks of him.  Perhaps Trollope is humorously suggesting that he is the “best” at being grey.  [JM 2005]

 

Crabtree PARVA and Crabtree Canonicorum

(in The Warden and Barchester TowersParva is a Latin adjective meaning “small.”  It is a play on Crabtree Canonicorum, mentioned in the same paragraph.  ”Canonicorum” is derived from the Latin adjective canonicalis which means “canonical.”  A canonical piece of land is one that belongs to the church.  The name “Crabtree Canonicorum” sounds very prestigious.  Lending it that name makes the reader imagine it to be large, attractive, and in all probability wealthy.  The use of Latin in the case of Crabtree Parva, however, lends it a perhaps jarring sense of classical dignity.  It is a somewhat humorous approach to describing the place.  Leo Stelten, Dictionary of Ecclesiastical Latin.  Peabody, Massachusetts:  Hendrickson Publishers, 1995.  [TH 2005]

 

PATERNOSTER Row

(in The Warden) The name of a real street in London, on which is located the fictitious publishing shop which published Mr. Harding’s Church Music.  This name consists of two Latin words, pater and noster, and refers to the Christian prayer the “Our Father,” or Pater Noster in Latin.  The ecclesiastical echo of the street’s name befits both Mr. Harding’s profession and his publication.  [MD 2005; rev. RR 2014]

 

PENELOPE Gauntlet

(in The Bertrams) Penelope Gauntlet is the aunt of Adela Gauntlet.  Penelope lives in Littlebath, and allows Adela to visit and thus be with Caroline Waddington.  In Greek mythology, Penelope is the name of Odysseus’ extremely dutiful wife.  This aspect of the name does not appear to be used by Trollope.  However, Penelope Gauntlet is seen at one point in a manner not befitting the character she was named for:  when Adela needs her after the death of her father, her aunt is not at home but traveling.  This is in contrast to the Penelope of the Odyssey, who stayed at home while waiting for Odysseus to return.  [CMC & RR 2012]

 

PESSIMIST Anticant

(in The Warden) “Pessimist” from Latin pessimus “worst;” “Anticant” from Greekanti “against or in opposition,” and Latin cantare “to sing.” “Cant” in English comes to refer to language that is hypocritical, whining, monotonous, or specialized to the point of obscurity.  OED.  [JM & RR 2005]

 

PHOEBE

(in The Claverings) In Chapter 16 of The Claverings Trollope mentions that Lady Ongar’s maid Phoebe grows tired as she waits for her mistress.  The name “Phoebe” means “shining one” in Greek and may recall either the sun or the moon:  Phoebus Apollo is the Classical god of the sun, and “Phoebe” (the feminine form of Phoebus and originally the name of a Titan) is often used as an alternate name for the moon or for Artemis, the sister of Apollo who is herself associated with the moon.  If the resonance with Phoebus is active here, the maid’s name aptly illustrates her difficulty retaining consciousness, since the sun which her name recalls has long since set.  If the connection to Phoebe is pursued, the maid’s name serves to underscore the lateness of the hour:  even the moon is tired.  [SH 2012 & RR 2013]

 

REGINALD Morton

(in The American Senator)Reginald Morton’s name is derived from the Latin rex (stem reg-) meaning “king.”  When first introduced, Reginald is far from regal:  he is not the squire of Dillsborough, and he is unable to articulate his feelings about Mary Masters.  However, by the end of The American Senator, he has come into the Latin root of his name.  Reginald has become squire and is engaged to Mary Masters.  It is no coincidence that Trollope introduces his nickname of “Reg” (which is very phonetically similar to rex) at the end of the novel once he has become the “king” of Dillsborough.  [CMC 2012]

 

Stogpingum =Stoke PINGUIUM

(in The Warden, Barchester Towers, and The Last Chronicle of Barset) The word “Pinguium” in the original name of this parish is a form of the Latin word pinguis, meaning “fat” or “fertile.”  In The Last Chronicle of Barset,the narrator comments that its current name, “Stogpingum,” is the result of “barbarous Saxon tongues [having] clipped it of its proper proportions.”  This phrase satirizes those who prefer the aesthetics of Latin to other languages.  [EB 2006]

 

The Musical SCRUTATOR

(in Barchester Towers) A Latin word meaning “examiner,” “investigator,” or “scrutinizer.”  The OED cites instances of the word used in English as early as 1593.  Trollope uses it as a part of the name of a periodical which is dedicated to the topic of music.  This publication presents critical reviews of musical composers and their works.  It is said to have commented on Mr. Harding’s work, Harding’s Church Music, and given it praise.  [MD 2005]

 

SELINA Gresham

(in Doctor Thorne) Of Mr. Gresham’s six named daughters, five have names with Classical roots:  Selina, Helena, Sophy, Beatrice, and Augusta.  ”Selina” comes from the Greek Selene, which was the name of the moon goddess.  Mike Campbell, Behind the Name.  [JC 2005]

 

SEPTIMUS Harding

(in The Warden, Barchester Towers, Framley Parsonage, The Small House at Allington, and The Last Chronicle of Barset) The warden’s given name is Septimus, from the Latin word for “seventh.”  As Harding is arguably the holiest character in The Warden, it is appropriate that his name would correspond to a holy number.  The Catholic Encyclopedia, entry on the use of numbers.  [JC 2005]

 

SOPHIA Wilkinson

(in The Bertrams) Trollope gives this name to one of Arthur Wilkinson’s sisters.  Sophia is the Greek word for “wisdom.”  As a very minor character in The Bertrams, Sophia Wilkinson does not have much opportunity to show her eponymous trait, but in Chapter 42 Trollope calls her “more prudent” than her sister Mary because she understands that Adela Gauntlet loves Arthur.  [RR 2012]

 

SOPHIE Gourdeloup

(in The Claverings) Sophie Gordeloup is the sister of Count Pateroff and Julia’s persistent, though increasingly undesired, companion.  While she makes a pretense of her willingness to help various other characters throughout the novel, her primary concern is for herself, and she schemes for ways to stay connected to Julia.  She is also rumored to be a foreign spy.  Her caginess may justify the etymology of her name:  “Sophie” comes from Greek sophia, “wisdom.”  Sophie’s unappealing craftiness contrasts with the winning sweetness of the similarly named Sophy Burton.  [RR 2013]

 

SOPHY Burton

(in The Claverings) “Sophy” comes from the Greek noun sophia, meaning skill, knowledge, or wisdom.  Sophy Burton is only about four years old, so it is difficult to tell if her name speaks to her character.  However, it is ironic that her father, who disdains traditional Classical education and the airs it gives young men, would bestow a Classical name upon his daughter.  The winning sweetness of this Sophy contrasts with the unappealing scheming of another, similarly named character in The Claverings:  Sophie Gordeloup.  [SH 2012 & RR 2013]

 

SOPHY Gresham

(in Doctor Thorne) Of Mr. Gresham’s six named daughters, five have names with Classical roots:  Selina, Helena, Sophy, Beatrice, and Augusta. “Sophy” is a shortened form of the name Sophia, which comes from the Greek word for wisdom.
Mike Campbell, Behind the Name. [JC 2005]

 

The SPECTATOR

(in The Small House at Allington) A spectator is a person who watches a certain event.  ”Spectator” comes from the Latin verb spectare which means “to watch” and the related noun spectator, “watcher” or “onlooker.”  The name of the newspaper which John Eames and Major Grantly exchange is called Spectator.  OED.  [KD 2006]

 

THEODORE Burton

(in The Claverings)  The name “Theodore” is composed of the Greek words for “god” (theos) and “gift” (dōron).  Although Harry Clavering sometimes mentally disparages his future brother-in-law Theodore Burton, Theodore and his family become a sort of god-send for Harry in his troubles.  [RR 2012]

 

THEOPHILUS Grantly

(in all the Barchester novels)Dr. Grantly has a significant first name.  The name “Theophilus” is Greek, meaning either “God-loving” or “beloved of God.”  This name creates some irony as we see that Dr. Grantly seems to love the church as an institution more than he loves God.  [JC 2005]

 

Constance VANE

(in The Claverings) We do not meet Constance Vane directly as a character, but Lady Ongar mentions her to Harry Clavering as a type of a fashionable English girl not particular appealing to either of them, though neither says so explicitly.  Though Trollope does not tell us much about Constance, he tells us enough to realize that her name is partly ironic and partly fitting.  Her first name, “Constance,” is related to the Latin participle constans, meaning “standing firm” or even “remaining unchanged.”  But Constance has not been constant in her looks:  she has changed from “a waxen doll of a girl” to a “stout mother of two or three children.”  Her maiden name, “Vane,” recalls the Latin adjective vanus, meaning “empty” and is apt, since Trollope asserts that “she had never had a thought in her head, and hardly ever a word on her lips.”  By giving her this name, Trollope adds linguistic depth to an otherwise insubstantial character.  [RR 2013]