Chapter 43 – Mr. Crosbie Goes into the City

June 14th, 2011 § 0 comments

That his patron and his partner was half drunk

Musselboro notices that Broughton is drunk during Crosbie’s visit.  Trollope often mentions the Roman system of patron and client, but it is interesting that here Boughton is both partner and patron.  The patron and client system implies a hierarchy between the men, while a partnership implies equality.  [KD 2006]

 

Mr. Musselboro’s genius

Crosbie perceives that Musselboro is a man of power after Boughton returns drunk and makes a fool of himself.  He notices that Musselboro’s “genius” was on the rise in Hook Court.  A genius is a protective spirit associated with the Roman household.  Clearly Mr. Musselboro is the guardian at Hook Court.  [KD 2006]

 

Burton or Bangle, Bangle or Burton

Mr. Crosbie is supposed to ask Bangle and Burton to help him pay his debts.  A chiasmus is a Classical rhetorical and poetic arrangement of words.  A chiasmus’ word order is ABBA.  Trollope here uses a chiasmus in his repetition of Bangle and Burton’s names.  [KD 2006]

 

Presiding genius

Crosbie runs into Sir Raffle Buffle after his meeting at Hook Court.  Crosbie remembers Raffle Baffle as the former “presiding genius” at his office.  A genius is a protective or guardian spirit associated with the Roman household.  [KD 2006]

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