Chapter 59 – The Last Effort

June 1st, 2012 § 0 comments

patronage

Mary Masters is under the impression that her growing love for Reginald Morton will go unanswered.  As she contemplates his taking another wife when he becomes squire, she resolves never to submit to such a woman’s patronage.  Here, the Classical sense of a patron is being invoked, as Mary is viewing Reginald’s future wife as a social patron as opposed to an economic one.  This use is especially strong as it would be expected that the squire and his wife would be the patrons (in the Classical sense) of all residents of Dillsborough.  [CMC 2012]

 

manliness and courage

Trollope here is being clever in his knowledge of etymology.  The sentence “A man’s courage lies in his heart;– but if his heart is broken where will his courage be then?” contains within it a Latin etymological echo.  The “cour-” in “courage” is derived from the Latin noun cor, “heart.”  Trollope has placed a similar echo (albeit an English one) in the statement previous to this one:  “How can a man be manly when the manliness is knocked out of him?”  [CMC 2012]

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