Chapter 13 – At Bragton

May 29th, 2012 § 0 comments

women’s work and men’s work

Arabella is described by Trollope as having to put forth an incredible amount of effort in order to find a husband.  The idea of the substantial work that women put forth and how it compares with the work of men is addressed by Euripides in the Medea.  Medea describes the plight of women, how much work it is to behave properly in society and find a suitable husband.  She ends this speech with one of the most famous lines in the play, in which she says that though men think they are brave for going to war, but she would rather go to battle thrice than give birth once.  This is the first of many comparisons (both implicit and explicit) of Arabella to Medea. [CMC 2012]

Source:  Euripides, Medea 214-251.

 

He and I were of the same par

Here, Mr. Mainwaring the rector uses the Latin par to denote that at one time he and the then Lord Mistletoe (now Duke of Mayfair) were members of the same social circle due to their attending university together at Christchurch.  Mr. Mainwaring is using Latin to associate himself and the duke with the same educated and elite circle.  [CMC 2012]

Sources:  OED, LS.

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